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The Foundation for European Progressive Studies (FEPS) is the think tank of the progressive political family at EU level. Our mission is to develop innovative research, policy advice, training and debates to inspire and inform socialist and social democratic politics and policies across Europe.

FEPS works in close partnership with a solid network of 74 member organisations, boosting coherence among stakeholders from the world of politics, academia and civil society at local, regional, national, European and global levels. More

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10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
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Progressive Post
12/07/2024

After the general election, France in a political conundrum

12/07/2024

Le Pen’s delayed victory

12/07/2024

French united Left first in elections – a new breath for French democracy

Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
Find all related publications
Publications
10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
Find all related Progressive Post
Progressive Post
12/07/2024

After the general election, France in a political conundrum

12/07/2024

Le Pen’s delayed victory

12/07/2024

French united Left first in elections – a new breath for French democracy

Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
Find all related publications
Publications
10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
Find all related Progressive Post
Progressive Post
12/07/2024

After the general election, France in a political conundrum

12/07/2024

Le Pen’s delayed victory

12/07/2024

French united Left first in elections – a new breath for French democracy

Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
Find all related publications
Publications
10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
Find all related Progressive Post
Progressive Post
12/07/2024

After the general election, France in a political conundrum

12/07/2024

Le Pen’s delayed victory

12/07/2024

French united Left first in elections – a new breath for French democracy

Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
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Progressive Migration Group conference

25 - 26/09/2024
Brussels, Belgium (Expert meeting)

Forging the new EU agenda

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07 - 09/07/2024
Vienna, Austria

YAN 9th cycle first seminar

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The Progressive Post

After the general election, France in a political conundrum

18/06/2024

By calling a snap general election three weeks ago, president Macron had wished to ‘clarify’ the political situation. He certainly did not get what he was hoping for. His ‘Ensemble’ coalition came second and lost 72 seats. His two political opponents – the New Popular Front (NFP, a left-wing coalition) and National Rally (RN, far right) fared well in many respects.

This was a strange election. The campaign was brisk and tense, and the first-round results set National Rally as the clear favourite to win the second round. Until the end, all opinion polls predicted a clear RN win, which, however, did not materialise on election night. The reason for this unexpected outcome is that the French electorate voted tactically and did so to avoid letting RN win the race. Had RN prevailed in the ballot box, Macron would have had to invite Jordan Bardella, the RN leader, to form a far-right government, a first in France since World War II.

Tactical voting is called the ‘republican front’ in France. It refers to the array of political parties in the mainstream that share common political values as opposed to fringe parties on the extremes. This voting reflex shows that a large majority of voters still regard RN as a party that represents a ‘threat to democracy’. Despite Marine Le Pen’s hard work to ‘de-demonise’ her party, voters still do not think RN is a mainstream party. In between the two rounds, the French press reminded voters of that reality by running stories about RN candidates with extremist backgrounds or a record of racist and antisemitic statements. The ‘republican front’ worked far better than expected and was key to the election outcome. Twice, Emmanuel Macron was elected to the presidency thanks to left-wing votes that helped him defeat Marine Le Pen in 2017 and 2022. Macron was ungracious enough to fail to acknowledge this support. Besides, in the run-up to the vote, he dismissed both opposing blocs as ‘extremes’. Yet, left-wing voters were very disciplined and voted in droves for ‘Ensemble’ candidates whenever their favourite candidate had pulled out from the race to avoid splitting the anti-RN vote. This explains why Macron’s coalition, with only 12 seats less than NFP, eventually did better than expected.

After the first round, a Bardella government seemed on the cards. In the end, the far right came in third position. It is a setback, but whether RN leaders will feel aggrieved at the result remains to be seen. By declaring that ‘our victory is only postponed’, with the 2027 presidential election in mind, Marine Le Pen may have a point. Despite being defeated, RN can point to new successes. With 143 MPs, RN has won 55 more seats, the biggest gains of all parties. It is now a competitive party in virtually all constituencies across France and appeals to all segments of the electorate in terms of class, gender and age. As for seats and vote percentage, RN is now, by far, the first party in French politics. The truth is that Macron’s dissolution took the far-right party by surprise: Jordan Bardella, the untested 28-year-old leader, was not ready to govern. Le Pen may also have secretly breathed a sigh of relief: running a minority government for three years may have been an unwelcome distraction from her fourth presidential bid. So, a defeat it may be this time round for RN, but certainly not a disaster. In the meantime, RN will bid its time in opposition and call out the ‘establishment parties’ of the left and right, which have jointly ‘stolen’ RN’s victory.

For the left, it was the sweetest of victory. Deeply divided until just a month ago, it managed a most unlikely come-back to win the election. NFP drafted a common programme in no time and ran a disciplined campaign. This paid off for several reasons. First, NFP’s programme advocates solid wealth redistribution through imposing a wealth tax on financial transactions, it is committed to raising the minimum wage, reversing Macron’s rise in the pension age from 62 to 64 or investing in public services. These areas have been neglected by Macron, so NFP’s left-wing Social Democracy struck a chord with the electorate. Furthermore, NFP is a broad left-wing coalition, not a ‘hard left’ one. It comprises radical left forces (such as Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s France Insoumise) but also moderate ones (such as former president François Hollande’s Parti Socialiste who, in another twist in the tale, was elected an MP in his old Corrèze constituency). During the campaign, the divisive and controversial Mélenchon was decisively sidelined by his coalition partners. Socialists, Greens and Communists all came out publicly against his appointment as prime minister, should the left win the election. Now that it has won, Macron should invite NPF to form a government. A left-wing prime minister should be a consensual figure who can unite the left, work with Macron and make necessary compromises with his/her political opponents. A younger and female prime minister would be a good move for the left. Marine Tondelier, the Green party leader, who ran an energetic and impressive campaign, would fit such a description.

President Macron did not accept Gabriel Attal’s resignation as incumbent prime minister. He knows that forming a government may take time, as several options may be tested: a minority left-wing government, then a national unity coalition government comprising left-wing moderates, Ensemble ministers and some Republicans. Macron’s dissolution has not clarified anything. The vote made him much weaker altogether, and there is no absolute majority in sight in the National Assembly. What is more, Macron has not weakened the far right. On the contrary, RN is even more of a threat than it was before the election. All in all, this snap election has provided anything but clarification. France is still in a severe political conundrum with months, possibly years, of political instability and crisis. If indeed France experiences a major political crisis, Marine Le Pen’s RN might present itself as the alternative to a ‘failed and corrupt political establishment’ offering political stability and order.

Photo Credits: Shutterstock.com/AntoninAlbert

Find all related publications
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10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
The Progressive Post

Le Pen’s delayed victory

18/06/2024

The 2017 presidential election marked a major shake-up in French politics, with the election of the youngest president of the 5th Republic, who had entered politics two years earlier. In just a few months, Emmanuel Macron shattered the party system that had gradually taken hold in France over the previous forty years. In the face of the great anxiety gripping part of Western society due to the populist wave that has led to Brexit and then the election of Donald Trump, he had brilliantly succeeded in opposing an ‘elite populism’ and offering an alternative to the more traditional populism embodied by Marine Le Pen on the right and Jean-Luc Mélenchon on the left.

In 2019, French political life seemed to be gradually reorganising itself around a new division between ‘progressives’ and ‘nationalists’, as desired by both the president of the Republic and his opponent in the second round of the 2017 election, Marine Le Pen. The legislative elections held over the last two weeks have completely shattered this scenario, replacing it with a political landscape divided into three blocs: the left coalition, the centrist coalition and the far right.

The European elections as well as the first round of the legislative elections confirmed Marine Le Pen’s Rassemblement National’s (National Rally) ability to massively expand its electorate. It managed to retain the massive support of the categories that have made it so successful over the last 30 years: the working classes, especially blue-collar workers (53 per cent of whom voted for the RN) and the low-skilled (48 per cent). But the far right also made phenomenal inroads into the middle classes, winning 26 per cent of their votes. Its alliance with some conservative dissidents in 60 constituencies also helped it increase its share of the vote among the elderly, a strategic segment in French elections, from 24 per cent to 29 per cent between the two elections.

At the same time, the left coalition confirmed its strength among young voters (38 per cent), especially if they lived in large metropolitan areas. It also confirmed its dominance among the highly educated (35 per cent). However, the electoral alliance of several left-wing parties (Nouveau Front Populaire, NFP), essential in the French electoral system to qualify for the second round, led voters of Macron in 2022, who chose the Socialist Party in the European elections, to return to Macron’s candidates. This explains why the result of the Left (28 per cent) was lower than the addition of the votes of the four members of the coalition in the European elections (31.5 per cent). The loss was mainly among white-collar workers (from 38 to 33 per cent) and the over-65s (from 28 to 22 per cent).

These voters were reluctant to vote for a coalition that included Mélenchon’s radical left party (La France Insoumise, ‘France unbowed’). They reverted to voting for the centrist coalition, which mitigated the sociological collapse of ‘Macronism’. The dizzying fall in support for the president’s party during the European elections, to the point of almost disappearing among voters under 35 and the working classes, was partially reversed three weeks later, allowing Ensemble to regain decent scores among young people (15 per cent, +11 points) or workers (11 per cent, +6 points) and service workers (15 per cent, +9 points). Parallel gains among white-collar workers (+11) and the middle class (+8) were enough to qualify many of their candidates for the second round.

As the campaign was very short (three weeks), the issues debated before the first round were the same as in the runup to the European elections and tended to favour the National Rally: purchasing power, security and immigration, exactly the issues that Le Pen has taken up for many years. On the other hand, climate change, a key issue for progressives, was virtually absent from this campaign.

On the evening of the first round, the country seemed to be quietly moving towards an unprecedented shift and the arrival of the far right in power. But that was without considering France’s first-past-the-post with two rounds electoral system, where the National Rally is, so far, unable to mobilise enough voters to break through in the second round. The massive withdrawal of candidates from the Left and centre was more effective than expected in blocking Le Pen’s party. On election day, 46 per cent voted to avoid the National Rally, while only 36 per cent did the same to avoid a victory for the left-wing coalition and 18 per cent to avoid Macron’s alliance. With 143 deputies in the new National Assembly, the National Rally won 55 seats compared to previous elections, but it failed to break the glass ceiling in crucial categories and win a majority of votes in many constituencies. For example, it won only 32 per cent of the over-65 vote, barely three points more than in the first round. This is notoriously insufficient given that this age group now represents more than one in four registered voters in the country and almost 30 per cent of the electorate.

The question now is whether the ‘republican barrage’ that was so effective last Sunday will continue to work in the next election, which will likely be the presidential election in 2027. From this point of view, the reconstruction of a progressive political offer that is perceived as acceptable by the moderate electorate is a crucial issue. Indeed, in the duels between a left-wing candidate and a candidate from the National Rally in the second round, the far right was almost on a par with the candidates from Mélenchon’s party, despite the withdrawal of centrist candidates between the two rounds. As things currently stand, a duel between Le Pen and Mélenchon in the runoff of the 2027 presidential elections, would currently be the National Rally candidate’s best chance of winning the Élysée in three years’ time. 

Photo Credits: Shutterstock.com/kipgodi

Find all related publications
Publications
10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

Building Economic Democracy in Europe

Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

Responsibility-sharing or shifting?

New Pact Implementation series
Find all related news
News
04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
The Progressive Post

French united Left first in elections – a new breath for French democracy

18/06/2024


When President Emmanuel Macron decided to dissolve the French National Assembly, he chose the shortest timeline allowed by the French constitution. This was meant to make it impossible for all left-wing and green parties, which had just fought against each other in European elections, to rally together. But in five days, they built the ‘New Popular Front’ – a reference to the 1936 Popular Front. They decided on who would run in which constituency, agreed on a common programme with strong social and ecological priorities, that would end seven years of Macron’s conservative-liberal policies. And on Sunday, the second round of general elections, with the highest turnout in four decades, brought a surprise: the left wing came first in the general elections.

The left-wing coalition, the ‘New Popular Front’ (Nouveau Front Populaire) , was named after the 1936 ‘Front Populaire’, a left-wing coalition formed for the 1936 legislative elections around the Radical Party, the French Section of the Workers’ International (SFIO) and the Communist Party. With a majority of seats, it formed four governments between June 1936 and April 1938 – in times of political instability and the rise of the extreme right in Europe. The first of these governments was led by the socialist Léon Blum, the next two by the radical Camille Chautemps, and the short-lived last one by Léon Blum again. The Communists supported them but did not participate.

The New Popular Front appeared in a quite similar context, where right-wing extremists are already in government in several countries in Europe and the extreme right Rassemblement National had just scored first in European elections. The dissolution was announced a few minutes after the EU elections results had been published, and Macron’s party had been defeated. While it managed to eclipse these humiliating results, the campaign did not save the presidential party, which scored second in the general elections.

On Sunday 7 July, the New Popular Front defied polls and political experts and won the most seats in France’s National Assembly (182), thus beating back a far-right surge but failing to win an outright majority. While the presidential party had already failed to get an absolute majority in 2022, and had been ruling with a minority government since then, they have now come in only second, with 168 seats. The extreme-right Rassemblement National came third, with 143 seats, and the conservative ‘Republicans’ scores only at 46, stuck between liberal and populist right-wing parties.

This is definitely a stress test for democracy and for Macron’s ability to respect French voters’ democratic voice. 

Having the French president and prime minister coming from opposing political parties, is called, in French, a cohabitation. In the history of the French Fifth Republic, there have been three cohabitations. But this is the first time for Macron. In the French presidential system, the president proposes the prime minister. He, however, has to follow the electoral outcome. Following the general elections, he should, therefore, appoint a prime minister from the New Popular Front. 

But he has not yet. Not only did he decide to refuse Attal government’s resignation on Monday 8 July, on the pretext of ‘ensuring the stability of the country’, but he also has allowed ministers to retain all their prerogatives. By doing so, The French president broke with the tradition of having a resigning government manage day-to-day matters after a majority change in parliament. Instead, the government is back to its business as usual: the economy minister announced on 11 July urther budget cuts of 5 billion euros, and further reforms are expected to come.

This was a stress test for Macron’s democratic values – and he failed. The outcome of the elections leaves France with the stunning prospect of a hung parliament and a risk of political paralysis in one of the biggest European member states and Olympic host country. But after the threat overwhelming threat of an extreme-right government, it was the left-wing New Popular Front who has avoided it. It is now time for Macron to respect French democratic tradition and propose a prime minister who belongs to the first political movement in France, the New Popular Front. This prime minister will then have to enhance dialogue with the different parliamentary groups and negotiate a coalition around the New Front Populaire. But Macron’s refusal to launch this democratic process is paralysing French democracy. Olivier Faure, the leader of the French Pocialist Party, called once again for the president of the Republic to acknowledge his rand respect the voters’ will. 

After seven years of Macron’s authoritarian ruling, bypassing the National Assembly (23 ‘49.3 procedures’ in 18 months under Elisabeth Borne’s government), it is time to come back to real democratic parliamentary debate. It is time to launch a national congress with employers and trade unions. It is time to listen again to citizens and civil society. And that’s exactly at the heart of the New Popular Front’s priorities.

Photos Credits: Shutterstock.com/AntoninAlbert

Find all related publications
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10/07/2024

Digital regulatory power but technology taker

How do we create an ecosystem for the European digital model
03/07/2024

Embracing Feminist Foreign Policy within EU strategic foresight capabilities

03/07/2024

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Concepts, Cases and Achieving Progressive Change
20/06/2024

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Find all related news
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04/07/2024

FEPS Delegation attends T20/C20 Midterm Conference in Brazil

27/06/2024

Join Tax the EU Billionaires Day!

25/06/2024

The EUROPAEUM delegation visits FEPS

20/06/2024

FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members

Find all related in the media
In the media

NATO-bővítés sok vitával: érvek, ellenérvek és lobbik a Clinton-elnökség idején

by BBC History 07/07/2024
"The controversial NATO enlargement: pros, cons and lobbying during the Clinton presidency" This article, written by FEPS Secretary General László Andor, looks back to the 1990s when the Eastern enlargement of NATO was requested, discussed, orchestrated, and eventually completed.

Falsely historic European elections bring little change, says FEPS

by Agence Europe 18/06/2024
Agence Europe's article features an analysis of the EU election results by Ania Skrzypek, FEPS Director for Research and Training, published in The Progressive Post.

Die EU-Osterweiterung nach 20 Jahren: Kann die Konvergenz sozial und wirtschaftlich nachhaltig gestaltet werden?

by Wirtschaftsdienst 13/06/2024
'EU Eastward Enlargement After 20 Years: Socially and Economically Sustainable Convergence?' FEPS Secretary General László Andor co-authored this article of the German journal Wirtschaftsdienst

Flere har en computer som chef: »Det dræber al gejst og motivation«

by Finans 12/06/2024
'Several people have a computer as their boss: "It kills all spirit and motivation" Finans article features FEPS latest policy study and survey 'Computer in command'
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FEPS celebrates its annual General Assembly and welcomes new members